Saying No As A Positive Act

NO! NO! by guercio

We Disconnect: To Reconnect #5

With some regret I bring you the final issue of We Disconnect. I explain what’s up with that in my essay below and follow with links on saying no as a positive step forward.

Please do stay subscribed and you’ll be the first to know if I relaunch in any form.

Saying No As A Positive Act

While disconnecting from networked communications is driven in part by a rejection of the negative effects of spending excessive amounts of time checking devices and staring at screens, it is ultimately a very positive act.

Even if one doesn’t consider what one is embracing when turning off our smartphones the result is a reconnection to aspects of ourselves, the people we encounter and the environments in which we exist.

Shutting down We Disconnect is not so obviously positive but also not as a big a deal as deeply changing one’s lifestyle.

But it’s what I need to do at this point in my journey through life.

We Disconnect is the last of a series of side projects I’ve launched in recent years exploring various topics that interested me and for which I believed there existed an audience.

Previous explorations ran aground because I needed a strong response from the beginning to know that I was on the right track to a successful venture. With We Disconnect I know the audience is there and that, given time, I could connect with more like-minded folks.

I’ve also enjoyed writing these newsletters. It’s been a very personal and meaningful dive into a topic that’s close to my heart.

I like the newsletter format as well. It feels more personal than other forms of digital publishing and I feel a sense of connection to you for whom I write as I’m writing.

But a much bigger project is calling, one that I’ve picked at for many years and that I recently began digging into again.

That project is DanceLand, a platform for the dance community that doesn’t really exist in the form I envision.

I’ve explored the blogging side of this project but am now relaunching with an initial focus on dance studios. You can check it out over the next few months as I birth the newest version.

Recently, as I dug in and worked on an aspect of DanceLand that required me to develop more technical knowledge and also required more personal attention to those I hope to serve, I realized just how all-consuming this project will become.

To succeed at DanceLand I’m having to say no to many other things and that is a very positive act.

In some ways it’s the next step in a process I began recently with Lisa Linn Allen. She’s a new friend who has been kind enough to meet with me monthly to discuss the development of DanceLand.

In our first chat she pointed out that I might need to cut back on the things I was doing that weren’t DanceLand related and I fully agreed.

I then began a process of saying no to a variety of worthy distractions from email lists to other business opportunities. But I wasn’t ready to give up We Disconnect.

And, as with other decisions to say no, after making the choice to discontinue We Disconnect, I almost immediately found a hook pulling me back.

In this case the hook was a new subscriber, the first person that I didn’t already know. And it did throw me for a day or so.

Thanks for signing up! Sorry, but I have to go.

I could say much more but let me close by saying thank you to all my subscribers for your interest and attention.

I hope you found it worthwhile to say yes to receiving this newsletter and that your own process of disconnecting takes you on a rich path through life!

Clyde
clyde(at)fluxresearch(dot)com

Featured Event
Camp Press 2017

“Camp Press is a community event for technologists and geeks that focuses on building relationships offline. It’s a place to create long-lasting relationships with and learn from top technologists and web creators without the distractions of technology.”

Reclaiming Yourself
What Really Happens To Your Brain And Body During A Digital Detox
Elizabeth Segran

“After three days without technology, people’s posture noticeably changed. They began to adapt to primarily looking forward into people’s eyes, rather than downward into their screens. This opened up the front of their bodies, pushing back their shoulders and realigning the back of their head with the spine.”

“‘A wonderful side effect of this is that people’s general energy opens up,’ Unsworth says. ‘They appear much more approachable when they enter a room.'”

Freeing The Children
Cedarsong Forest Kindergarten

“Cedarsong Nature School’s philosophy is that children need to spend a large portion of their day outdoors to get the stimulation and natural learning experiences they are born to crave. We believe that hands-on experiential learning is the best educational approach for children.”

“Being outdoors provides them with not only fresh air, it encourages imaginative play, creativity, hand-eye coordination, balance, physical strength and mental clarity. When classroom children’s natural curiosity is encouraged, learning flows organically from stimuli encountered in the outdoors.”

The Positive Route
MsEasy on Twitter

“Do more things that make you forget to check your phone.”

Having The Experience
Lane 8 Explains Why Banning Cell Phones at His Live Sets Was the Best Decision Ever
Britt Julious

“I’ve been blown away by the response of fans on this tour. During the 17 shows we’ve done thus far, we have had serious issues with just a handful of people who refused to stop recording. 99.9% of fans have simply shown up, left their phones in their pockets, and had a great time.”

“In this day and age, that is truly remarkable. I think it’s a testament to the fact that fans are willing to try a different experience if you communicate it to them properly and give fair warning of what they should expect at the show.”

“I think it’s also a testament to everyone (myself included) realizing that we ALL spend way too much time on our phones. We should embrace experiences that refocus on human interaction and connection because they are rare.”

Being Alone To Reconnect
Wendell Berry on Solitude
Maria Popova

“True solitude is found in the wild places, where one is without human obligation.”

“One’s inner voices become audible. One feels the attraction of one’s most intimate sources.”

“In consequence, one responds more clearly to other lives. The more coherent one becomes within oneself as a creature, the more fully one enters into the communion of all creatures.”

Act Now
Angieisso retweeted on Twitter

“My phone camera won’t do the moon justice, so go outside and look up”

 

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